Assessment for Learning: Classroom Strategies to Improve Learning

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Assessment for Learning: Classroom Strategies to Improve Learning. NESA Winter Training Institute New Delhi, January 30-31, 2010. Damian Cooper (905) 823-6298 dcooper3@rogers.com. Session Outcomes. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Assessment for Learning: Classroom Strategies to Improve LearningNESA Winter Training InstituteNew Delhi, January 30-31, 2010Damian Cooper(905) 823-6298dcooper3@rogers.com

    Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, copyright 2009

  • Session OutcomesUnderstand the critical role played by assessment for learning in providing students with the information they need to improveLearn about research-based assessment for learning strategies that are proving to be effective in improving student learningShare with colleagues how these strategies may be appropriate to my own classroom

  • Changing GoalsMean

  • Changing GoalsRange of Competent Achievement

  • If the new goal of education is success for all, then we have no choice but toDifferentiate Instruction & Assessment InstructionStudents bring different knowledge & experience to schoolStudents learn at different ratesStudents learn in different waysAssessmentNot all students are able to demonstrate their learning in the same wayNot all students respond the same way to test pressureSome students need more scaffolding than others

  • Assessment for LearningAssessment for learning is any assessment for which the first priority in its design and practice is to serve the purpose of promoting students learning. It thus differs from assessment designed primarily to serve the purposes of accountability, or of ranking, or of certifying competence. Black, Wiliam et al. 2004

  • Assessment of LearningAssessment of learning includes those tasks that are designed to determine how much learning has occurred after a significant period of instruction. The data from such assessments is often used to determine report card grades.

  • Components of Assessment for Learning (Black & Wiliam, 1999)The provision of effective feedback to studentsThe active involvement of students in their own learningAdjusting teaching to take account of the results of assessmentRecognition of the profound influence assessment has on motivation and self-esteemThe need for students to be able to assess themselves and understand how to improve

  • Components of Assessment for Learning (Black & Wiliam, 2003)Oral questioning

    Marking as feedback

    Peer and self-assessment

    Formative use of summative tests

  • Components of Assessment for Learning (Wiliam, 2007)Clarifying learning intentions and sharing criteria for successEngineering effective classroom discussions, questions, and learning tasks that elicit evidence of learningProviding feedback that moves learners forwardActivating students as owners of their own learningActivating students as instructional sources for one another

  • Components of Assessment for Learning, (Chappuis, ETS)Clear learning targetsExamples of student workFeedbackSelf-assessment & goal-settingFocus on one aspect of quality at a timeTeach students focused revisionStudent self-reflection, tracking & sharing learning

  • Time to Talk About AssessmentAt your table, discuss which elements of assessment for learning are common to all the research

  • Components of Assessment for Learning (Cooper, 2007)Do I routinely share learning goals with my students so they know where we are heading?

    Do I routinely communicate to students the standards they are aiming for before they begin work on a task?

    Do I routinely have students self and peer assess their work in ways that improve their learning?

    Does my questioning technique include all students and promote increased understanding?

    Do I routinely provide individual feedback to students that informs them how to improve?

    Do I routinely provide opportunities for students to make use of this feedback to improve specific pieces of work?

  • Assessment for Learning: am I already doing it?Do I routinely share learning goals with my students so they know where we are heading?

  • Math ClassLearning Goal: You will demonstrate that you understand the relationship between the numerator and the denominator in a fraction.

    At the end of the lesson, Linda points to the poster on the classroom wall and asks her students: What did you learn in this lesson today?

    Their exit slip is to answer on a leaf and post it on the knowledge tree

    Linda told me that the most effective AFL strategy for her has been to write the learning goal for each days lesson on the board.

  • Assessment for Learning: am I already doing it?Do I routinely share learning goals with my students so they know where we are heading?

    Do I routinely communicate to students the standards they are aiming for before they begin work on a task?

  • Clear TargetsClarity of curriculum standardsHigh quality assessment tasksRubrics to describe what quality looks likeAnchors to show students what quality looks likeChecklists to enable students to monitor their own progress

  • Time to Talk About AssessmentWith your colleagues, respond to Jackies class in terms of ...- what was effective-what was ineffective-what you would do differently

  • Assessment for Learning: am I already doing it?Do I routinely share learning goals with my students so they know where we are heading?

    Do I routinely communicate to students the standards they are aiming for before they begin work on a task?

    Do I routinely have students self and peer assess their work in ways that improve their learning?

  • Formative Assessment StrategiesSelf and Peer AssessmentSelf & peer check before submissionCircling, NOT correcting errors1st. page marking ONLYPortfolio reflection strips

    Traffic Lights peerSnowball and peer assessment of essay

  • Math Class Pete has his students use Traffic Light signs at the start of a lesson on equivalent fractions, decimals and percentages to assess prior knowledge.

    Teacher: Do you know what the word equivalent means? Students show either the red or green side of the traffic light in response. He orally checks a sample of the green responses to see if they do, in fact, understand the term.

  • Music Class Students had been practising in groups of 3, playing a 3-part jazz composition. At the end of the lesson, each group performed and the teacher required peers to assess what they heard. Here is some of the conversation:

    Rachel: Holly went too fast.Sam: You all need to listen more to each other.Teacher: Now, who hasnt given any feedback yet? Tam, tell Emmas group how they did, and remember to be specific.Tam: Emmas fill was really good. Everyone was in good time.Teacher: Are you sure about that, Tam? (Tam hesitates.)Michael, what did you think about Emmas group?Michael: They all started out together, then Freddy seemed to get lost, but then they finished together.Teacher: Good feedback, Michael. Emmas group, do you agree with what Michael said?

  • English ClassSnowball activity to activate students prior knowledge about writing an effective response to an essay questionTeacher consolidates this information on the boardTeacher presents a sample answer on the board and guides students as they assess it, using colour codingStudents have 15 minutes to answer a sample essay questionStudents exchange responses and use coloured pencils to assess each others work

  • English Class peer assessment guideUnderline in blue the best sentence. Explain whyUnderline in red the worst sentence. Explain whyUnderline in green a good choice of quote DUnderline in purple a good explanation of the C effect of a quoteUnderline in orange a good link back to the B questionUnderline in pink 3 words you think Id get A excited aboutUnderline in brown anything you think is correct A+ but that I didnt teach youGrade

  • Why Involve Students in the Assessment Process?Students:Develop understanding of what quality work looks likeBecome independent monitors of their own workDevelop skills of metacognitionDevelop critical thinking skillsDevelop communication and interpersonal skills

  • Time to Talk About AssessmentDiscuss with your colleagues 1 of the self or peer assessment examples youve just heard about.Discuss the pros and cons of the strategy?Does this approach have application to your own classroom?How might you adapt the strategy to suit your own situation?

  • Assessment for Learning:am I already doing it?4. Does my questioning technique include all students and promote increased understanding?

  • Formative Assessment StrategiesChecks for UnderstandingThumbs Up!Traffic Lights selfThink. Pair. ShareOral questionning no handsCo-op hwk. take-upUngraded quiz graded test

    Individual white boardsOral response circle reciprocal teachingExit pass

  • Assessment for Learning:am I already doing it?4. Does my questioning technique include all students and promote increased understanding?

    5. Do I routinely provide individual feedback to students that informs them how to improve?

  • Provide tons of feedback Oral & written feedback tell students how to improve marks DONTEstablish classroom routines that create opportunities for teacher & peer feedbackProvide feedback ALONE on formative assessments; do NOT include marks

  • FeedbackNeeds to cause thinking: dont provide the answerMust not be evaluativeMust direct students towards improvementMust make reference to specific quality indicators (a rubric or checklist)Must include an expectation that it will be implementedMust include strategies for checking that it has been implemented

  • Formative Assessment StrategiesFeedbackWritten feedback:-done well-done poorly-try this next timeAssignment-focussed conferencing

    Implementing feedback:-mandatory-feedback log

  • Assessment for Learning:am I already doing it?4. Does my questioning technique include all students and promote increased understanding?

    5. Do I routinely provide individual feedback to students that informs them how to improve?

    6. Do I routinely provide opportunities for students to make use of this feedback to improve specific pieces of work?

  • Demand that feedback be acted upon Include feedback logs in student work books, binders, etc. Hold students accountable for showing you before & after workFocus student conferencing around feedback and how to act upon it

  • Commitment to ActionSpend a few moments reflecting on today .What was your most significant learning?What specific actions do you plan to take immediately and/or between now and June 2010?Who will be involved?What results would you like to see from these actions?How will you assess the effectiveness of these actions?

  • Some final thoughts...Change is a process, not an eventbeware the implementation dip. (Fullan)Dont work alone. Collaboration will help you problem solve and will improve the quality of your initiatives.Be proactive - communicate with parents and students before changing your practice.

    Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009*Damian Cooper, Plan~Teach~Assess, 2009

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